Pharmacists remain in the dark about free deployment of rapid antigen test by federal government | Liverpool City Champion

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PHARMACISTS are as uncertain as the rest of the community about how rapid antigenic testing will be made available and monitored for concession card holders, as promised by the federal government. The national cabinet agreed on Wednesday to provide up to 10 free three-month rapid antigen tests to around 6.6 million Australians on concession cards. But how they will be made available and tracked remains unclear. This following changes to the testing requirements, anyone who returns a positive rapid antigen test is no longer required to take a PCR test. Chelsea Felkai, president of the NSW branch of the Pharmaceutical Society and a Newcastle-based pharmacist, said pharmacists found out along with the rest of the community. “Pharmacists kind of feel like they’re the meat in between the sandwich,” Ms. Felkai said. “The government doesn’t seem to recognize the very sudden demand that these announcements tend to create.” We haven’t heard anything more about how this is going to play out. People come and ask a lot of questions, but at this point we haven’t been informed. talk about a different administrative process, ”she said. “More work and more paperwork, a whole new way to report. It’s just about reinventing the wheel. “

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PHARMACISTS are as uncertain as the rest of the community about how rapid antigenic testing will be made available and monitored for concession card holders, as promised by the federal government.

The national cabinet agreed on Wednesday to provide up to 10 free three-month rapid antigen tests to around 6.6 million Australians on concession cards. But how they will be made available and tracked remains unclear.

This following changes to the testing requirements, anyone who returns a positive rapid antigen test is no longer required to take a PCR test.

Chelsea Felkai, president of the NSW branch of the Pharmaceutical Society and a Newcastle-based pharmacist, said pharmacists found out along with the rest of the community.

“Pharmacists kind of feel like they’re the meat in between the sandwich,” Ms. Felkai said.

“The government doesn’t seem to recognize the very sudden demand that these announcements tend to create.

“We haven’t heard anything further on how it’s going to play out. People come in and ask a lot of questions, but at this point we haven’t been informed.”

Many pharmacists felt that if it was tied to Medicare, it would be easier.

“But they are talking about a different administrative process,” she said. “More work and more paperwork, a whole new way of reporting. It’s just about reinventing the wheel.”

This story Deployment of a free COVID test, a mystery first appeared on the Newcastle Herald.

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