Liverpool Society – Liverpool IL http://liverpool-il.com/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 21:13:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://liverpool-il.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default1-150x150.png Liverpool Society – Liverpool IL http://liverpool-il.com/ 32 32 Kathy Petras closes a book on 35 years of career at the library of Medina https://liverpool-il.com/kathy-petras-closes-a-book-on-35-years-of-career-at-the-library-of-medina/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 21:13:00 +0000 https://liverpool-il.com/kathy-petras-closes-a-book-on-35-years-of-career-at-the-library-of-medina/ MEDINA, Ohio – After 34.5 years as an associate at the Medina Library, Kathy Petras recently enjoyed an afternoon retirement party attended by her colleagues, family and people whom she has helped over the years with questions of all kinds – especially inquiries about genealogy and local history. Petras grew up on a farm near […]]]>

MEDINA, Ohio – After 34.5 years as an associate at the Medina Library, Kathy Petras recently enjoyed an afternoon retirement party attended by her colleagues, family and people whom she has helped over the years with questions of all kinds – especially inquiries about genealogy and local history.

Petras grew up on a farm near Caledonia, Ohio, before joining the Air Force in the 1970s to earn veterans benefits for his education.

She chose the Air Force so she could wear a blue uniform and travel, but said, “They put me in green fatigues” to do her job repairing airplane radios. Her first posting was in Ohio, but later she was sent to Okinawa.

In 1988, she joined the staff of the Medina County District Library (MCDL) and worked at the Medina Branch Reference Desk for 32 years.

Because her hobby was “digging up dead people,” when the Virginia Wheeler Martin Family History and Learning Center opened in December 2019, she was transferred there to work with genealogy, l local history, manufacturing space and digitization.

She would like to “thank the inhabitants of Medina who have entrusted me with their family history”. She commented that almost everyone has at least one skeleton in their closet.

Most of the guests who attended her party greeted her with a hug and words of praise.

According to Brunswick Library Director Connie Sureck, “She always amazes me with the incredible things she has done in her life. His knowledge of genealogy and local history is unmatched.

Wendy Campbell, a referral associate at the Medina Library for the past seven years, thought Petras was rather stern when she first worked with her, but “quickly realized she had a heart. Golden”.

In a Proclamation of Service Recognition presented to him by the MCDL Board of Trustees, Board Chairman Ryan Carlson praised Petras for being “an expert in deciphering handwriting most complex cursive written in a century”.

Rod Knight of the Liverpool Historical Society said: “There should be a law preventing Kathy from retiring! She always has a smile on her face, joy in her heart, and good response from her lips.

Tom Hilberg of the Medina County Historical Society, Susan McKiernan of the Weymouth Preservation Society and other history and genealogy enthusiasts stopped by to express their thanks for his years of service.

Petras says she will relax in her retirement, but also plans to help the Medina County Historical Society digitize hundreds of photographs donated to the society over the years.

She looks forward to having time to do what she wants. She certainly earned that right.

Learn more about the Sun of Medina.

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Artists return to East Liverpool | News, Sports, Jobs https://liverpool-il.com/artists-return-to-east-liverpool-news-sports-jobs/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 06:08:09 +0000 https://liverpool-il.com/artists-return-to-east-liverpool-news-sports-jobs/ Canfield’s Christi Kavinsky. (photo sent) The Ohio Plein Air Society and artists from the Eastern Ohio Plein Air Club will return to paint in Liverpool city center this year, this time at the East Liverpool High School Alumni Association All Class Meeting. Painters will set up easels throughout downtown and paint […]]]>

Canfield’s Christi Kavinsky. (photo sent)

The Ohio Plein Air Society and artists from the Eastern Ohio Plein Air Club will return to paint in Liverpool city center this year, this time at the East Liverpool High School Alumni Association All Class Meeting. Painters will set up easels throughout downtown and paint from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, July 2. A parade and sale will take place in front of the Museum of Ceramics starting at 3:30 p.m. The public is invited to come downtown and watch the artists at work and stop on the sidewalk to show a sale. Artists look forward to capturing the excitement and nostalgia of the reunion as well as the unique architecture and ambiance of the pottery capital of the world. Twenty-five artists participated in last year’s event held in May as part of the Ceramics Museum’s 40+1 anniversary celebration. This year, like last year, some participating artists received regional, national and even international recognition for their work. Several companies lent their support to the event, including Plein Air Magazine, Streamline Publications, Liliedahl Art Instruction Videos, Rosemary & Co. Artist Brushes, Judson’s Art Outfitters and Golden Artist Colors. The Ceramics Museum graciously offered its facilities as a home base for the artists throughout the day. For more information, contact organizer Sheri Liebschner, sheriliebschner@gmail.com, or the Ceramics Museum at 330-386-6001.




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‘You don’t turn your back on your family’: A day with Liverpool Homeless Football Club https://liverpool-il.com/you-dont-turn-your-back-on-your-family-a-day-with-liverpool-homeless-football-club/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 14:45:25 +0000 https://liverpool-il.com/you-dont-turn-your-back-on-your-family-a-day-with-liverpool-homeless-football-club/ A football kicks repeatedly against the wooden planks surrounding an indoor pitch tucked away inside a unit on an industrial estate in North Wales. Eight men – all wearing blue sportswear, four also with red bibs, chase each other around the artificial pitch. Several others stand behind the wire to the side shouting instructions and […]]]>

A football kicks repeatedly against the wooden planks surrounding an indoor pitch tucked away inside a unit on an industrial estate in North Wales.

Eight men – all wearing blue sportswear, four also with red bibs, chase each other around the artificial pitch. Several others stand behind the wire to the side shouting instructions and encouragement while two other teams, one in yellow and another in orange, lounge behind on benches or on the grass outside enjoying from the afternoon heat.

The quality of football is surprisingly good. Players play street football – side four where a goalkeeper stays inside their penalty area and outfield players defend with two and attack with three.

READ MORE: ‘Football mad’ U8 man creates Liverpool‘s own ‘World Cup’ tournament

The four-team tournament takes place at the Football Lab in an industrial area 10 minutes from Flint. It is organized by Street Football Wales – a charity which gives opportunities to people who find themselves in difficult situations due to low income, homelessness, unemployment or lack of skills.

The two teams in blue are Liverpool Homeless Football Club. Earlier, 13 men had piled into a minibus outside the Powerleague grounds, just north of the city centre. The pitches are an unofficial base for the club – a place where bi-weekly sessions on Tuesdays and Thursdays are held for people to come and play football.

The club founded by John Finnigan in 2007 uses sport, particularly football, to engage with Merseyside’s most vulnerable.

“I believe in it – I believe in the power of football, or any sport for that matter,” says John as he sits on the lawn outside the football pitches. “I worked in a hostel with 36 guys who all had alcohol, drug, mental health issues, it was chaotic.

“One day I took three guys on my day off to play football and it was the hostel change. Previously I was a screw with them and no one spoke to me. But after I took them in football once, everything changed.

“The following week I had nine who wanted to come and it grew from that. There was no longer a barrier there and I was spoken to as a mate.”

After spending 27 years in the hostel and juggling the football club, he used the money donated by former LFC player Jamie Carragher which enabled him to earn a salary and he ran the football club full time. But as much as the charity is focused on football, John adds it’s more about reducing isolation, offering emotional support and giving players new opportunities.

The 60-year-old, who holds a degree in housing and human environment from Newcastle University, said: “When you’re born in the city, especially in a poor environment, you don’t have a opportunities, so it’s important to us to get people out to meet new people.It’s what broadens your horizons and shows you there’s more to life.

At first the charity found players in hostels and shelters, but now, thanks to their walk-in sessions on Tuesdays and Thursdays, they are open to everyone.



John Finnigan, CEO of Liverpool Homeless FC

One man who has benefited from the charity is James – the player who scored the peach in the top corner earlier. The 31-year-old has been part of the football team since he was 23 years old.

“I love playing football and I’m happy to be back. It’s the first time I’ve played since October because I broke my collarbone trying to kick it,” he explains wiping his forehead with his red bib as he walks away from the pitch.

James is one of the best in the tournament. He previously played for teams such as Bootle FC and AFC Liverpool, but lived in and out of shelters and homeless hostels for several years.

“Smoking weed and gambling was my problem. I was going out and spending £400 of my salary before I even got home,” he explains. “Being in the homeless shelter was actually a blessing because it meant I had met John.

“Coming to football when you’re homeless is just the boss. It gives me a routine and something to look forward to twice a week – even if it’s only an hour or two. It’s the best thing I can do – it relieves me.”

James now lives in shared accommodation and is looking for a place of his own. He has a son, Chase, who will be two next week. “I spend my time with him – just walking down the park and seeing the family. I can’t wait to bring him to football.”

James’ story is just a story told during the day. Everyone – players and coaches – has a story of how he became a member of the football club.

There is Elvis, a former international footballer from the east coast of Africa who now works as a coach at the club. “Haggis”, a Scot who proudly shows off photos of his weight loss journey. “Seven and a half stones down now,” he said. He also organizes his own football matches and tournaments to support mental health after being inspired by the work of the club.

Darren has struggled with alcohol, but since joining the club he has been sober for two years. Pat is a key worker who comes to support his guys but also to play. “I don’t have cartilage in my knee and the doctors said I shouldn’t play, but it keeps me fit and active.” When Pat scores – passed by another player, JJ, before heading home past the goalkeeper – it elicits one of the biggest cheers of the day.

Dylan is a tall, tanned 26-year-old who speaks in an Irish drawl. He explains that he was working as a security guard at an inn when he met John. After discovering that Dylan had a physical education degree, John invited him to the sessions to meet the team.

“I was very lucky – I love it and I’ve been doing it for a year now. Helping people and being there for the guys is what matters. I’m not like a coach for the boys – they’re all my real friends and I really care about them.”



Liverpool Homeless FC in action at The Football Lab, Holywell
Liverpool Homeless FC in action at The Football Lab, Holywell

Dylan explains that he went through a rough patch emotionally after splitting from his girlfriend, but that the support of the band – and John in particular – helped him through it. “They’re all great people – they’re my friends and family here at Liverpool rolled into one.

“John took me under his wing and helped me. He’s like a father figure. I want to be successful in myself, but I want my success to lead to helping others, just like John.”

Because helping people and supporting them is what the football club is all about. As well as men’s football sessions on Tuesdays and Thursdays, both of which are free, the last Tuesday of the month sees a tournament involving teams from across the region and further afield competing. Food is served and guest speakers come down to give advice to the men. In addition to patron John Bishop, footballers such as Jamie Carragher and John Barnes passed on their wisdom.

The football club also organizes a session for women on Wednesdays. “Women’s Wednesdays,” laughs John. “They chose the name”. Wednesday sessions focus on supporting women, primarily those who have experienced domestic violence.

And on top of all that, they also offer the members of “the family” opportunities to progress towards employment, continuing education or volunteering. It could be in food preparation and hygiene or earning coaching badges. Throughout the day, a few players approach head coach Keith, or “Hecky” as some men call him, to inquire about the opportunity.

In addition to football advice and opportunities, Keith is also particularly vocal, urging men to be respectful and show respect. He told ECHO: “It doesn’t matter where people come from – that’s forgotten. In football, we all come with the same background.

“I tell them I know it can be frustrating, but I always insist on showing respect – it’s good to be competitive but don’t waste it on others or yourselves. There’s great camaraderie – they’re a good group of boys and they bounce off each other.

“I think guys respect me because I’m really on their level. You have to be a bit of a chameleon and know how to communicate with everyone. I’m just a normal guy who has problems like everyone else, but when I I am here, my problems are left at the door.”



John Finnigan(Chief Executive)centre,with members and coaches of Liverpool Homeless Football Club.(Pic Andrew Teebay).
Liverpool Homeless Football Club

Keith has been involved with the club for two years after being recommended to John. He is coached at a semi-professional level and also has his own coaching business where he offers one-on-one sessions. “For me routine and structure are key – have a purpose in what you do. That’s why I mentioned coaching – when guys are ready they can come and work with me, no problem at all .”

The tournament ends with both Liverpool teams watching from the sidelines. A quick introduction and discussion about future collaboration between the teams ensues before the men get back into the minibus for the hour-long journey home.

The mood on the bus is jovial – the players taunt John for leaving someone behind while Keith warns them to get their passports out when the bus returns to England.

But with a cost of living crisis enveloping the country, the most vulnerable in society risk being left behind. And like all charities, Liverpool Homeless FC are in financial difficulty. “Funds are drying up now,” says John.

“But what can we do, we can’t take it away. People depend on it – I have a responsibility to get the funding to continue to support our guys and girls. They’ve had people take it from them. stuff all their life – but we won’t. You don’t turn your back on your family.

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‘It takes a village to build a whale’: Dal’s Blue Whale project set to take off this fall – Dal News https://liverpool-il.com/it-takes-a-village-to-build-a-whale-dals-blue-whale-project-set-to-take-off-this-fall-dal-news/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 20:04:11 +0000 https://liverpool-il.com/it-takes-a-village-to-build-a-whale-dals-blue-whale-project-set-to-take-off-this-fall-dal-news/ Since 2017, Dalhousie’s Blue Whale Project has left a deep impression on everyone who meets it, from students and teachers to community members and volunteers. Now, just months away from the blue whale’s arrival at its final resting place in the Dal’s Steele Ocean Science Building, there is a buzz of excitement around the university. […]]]>

Since 2017, Dalhousie’s Blue Whale Project has left a deep impression on everyone who meets it, from students and teachers to community members and volunteers. Now, just months away from the blue whale’s arrival at its final resting place in the Dal’s Steele Ocean Science Building, there is a buzz of excitement around the university.

“Things are definitely looking up,” says Gordon Price (pictured right), professor and program manager for the Innovation Waste Management Program at Dalhousie Agriculture Campus. “It feels like we’re getting closer to the finish line.”

The project, now five years old, has turned the tragic loss of an 18-metre blue whale into a learning opportunity for the Dal community and beyond.

“For years, I felt Dal needed a project like this,” says Dalhousie University veterinarian Chris Harvey-Clark. “In 2017, when I got the call from the Marine Animal Response Society that a blue whale had been found [near Liverpool, N.S.]I knew this was our chance.

After a thorough necropsy, a rigorous phase of composting and degreasing began with the help of Dr. Price’s team and supported by the Faculties of Agriculture and Science, as well as Dal students and community volunteers. . During this phase, the bones were also weighed and 3D scanned to develop a digital archive of the skeleton. In 2021, the complete skeleton was sent to Research Casting International (RCI), an Ontario company specializing in the preparation and assembly of museum exhibits.

Once completed, the bones will be shipped back to Halifax to be installed in the atrium of the Dal’s Steele Ocean Sciences Building. This phase of the project is on track to be completed this fall, which will result in the first blue whale show of its kind in Nova Scotia.

Further reading: Rebuild the greatest giant of the ocean

Showcasing Dal’s Assets

Since its inception, the Blue Whale Project has made full use of the resources available at Dalhousie, including education and research into ocean conservation and marine biodiversity.

“The project represents a complete picture of what we can do as a university,” says Dr. Price. “It’s about bringing together our roles as educators and scientists, using our expertise to create a shared experience between [Halifax and Truro] campus and share a tangible result with the wider community.

Dr. Harvey-Clark recalls his time as a veterinary student where he worked with a bottlenose dolphin, which became a defining moment for his career. “I hope it’s a very similar experience for students who have worked with the blue whale,” he shares. “Dal is a place where these experiences can be made available to students.”


Blue whale bones at Research Casting International in Ontario. (Photo by Chris Hogarth/RCI)

A wave of support

Like the two Drs. Price and Harvey-Clark are quick to point out that this project would not be possible without a helping hand. “It takes a whole village to build a whale,” says Dr. Harvey-Clark. “There was strength in the interdisciplinary nature of the project, in its collaboration. The outpouring of support has been tremendous. »

Both would like to thank the many people and organizations whose role in this project has been instrumental, including Pierre-Yves Daoust of the Atlantic Veterinary College, Laura Bourque of the Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative, as well as people from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Species at Risk Act, Marine Animal Response Society and the New Brunswick Museum.

Dal alum Chris Hogarth (BComm’19) is now marketing director at RCI, the company that restores whale bones. He shares that displays of blue whales have become more common in recent years. “To a large extent, this is a pity, because more and more [blue whales] wash up on shore,” he says. “But the end result is heartwarming. It’s a chance to raise awareness – awareness of ocean conservation, research and much more.


A blue whale in the wild. (NOAA picture)

It’s this same mentality that has inspired donors around the world to support the project’s fundraising campaign, Dive In. To date, over 100 supporters (and counting) have named blue whale bones, which will be registered on part of the exhibition to be unveiled this fall. Through this support, current and future generations will be inspired to help save our oceans and their species.

“I was happy to support this project in honor of my uncle, Captain Johan Carlson Borgen, who was a prominent captain during the first half of the 20th century,” says Dal alumnus Chaytor (DDS’62 , MEd’91). “He always believed in putting an end to the slaughter of whales. To me, he was a hero.”

Another community supporter, Paul Edwards, shares, “My daughter Addison recently attended a community event where Dr Sarah Fortune, Chair of Great Whale Conservation at the Dal Oceanographic Department, spoke. I supported this project in recognition of her 6th grade graduation, her keen interest in science, and her inspiration from the work of Dr. Fortune.

Donations made to Dive In will continue to help support the time and resources needed to bring this one-of-a-kind exhibit to life later this fall.

“When visitors walk into the Steele Ocean Sciences Building and look up, they are amazed,” says Dr. Harvey-Clark. “It sends the message that this is something precious, something we need to protect. It’s more powerful than a radio or TV message. It’s something that will stay with you.

For more information on how you can help support Dive In: The Blue Whale Project, please visit projectdal.ca/bluewhale

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The Snuts announce new album “Burn the Empire” https://liverpool-il.com/the-snuts-announce-new-album-burn-the-empire/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 18:30:31 +0000 https://liverpool-il.com/the-snuts-announce-new-album-burn-the-empire/ Up and coming Scottish rock band The Snuts have announced that their highly anticipated new album Burn The Empire will arrive October 7, 2022 via Parlophone Records/Elektra Records. Burn The Empire follows the band’s debut album, WL, which reached number one on the UK Albums Chart last year. Today, The Snuts unveiled the fourth preview […]]]>

Up and coming Scottish rock band The Snuts have announced that their highly anticipated new album Burn The Empire will arrive October 7, 2022 via Parlophone Records/Elektra Records. Burn The Empire follows the band’s debut album, WL, which reached number one on the UK Albums Chart last year. Today, The Snuts unveiled the fourth preview of the record with new single “The Rodeo”.

Premiered as Clara Amfo’s “Hottest Record In The World” on BBC Radio 1, new single “The Rodeo” is a carefree, floor-four indie anthem destined to ignite live crowds around the world.

“‘The Rodeo’ is about knowing that your life is more often than not completely out of your control. It’s about finding merit in the madness and celebrating the journey and not just the destination. It’s the musical equivalent of cowboys versus aliens,” shares singer Jack Cochrane. “We want him to encourage the feeling of pure and inclusive absolute escapism through guitar music.

One of the UK‘s most exciting acts right now, The Snuts deliver 11 slices of sonic brilliance on Burn The Empire. Produced by longtime collaborators Detonate and Clarence Coffee Jr, the album continues the band’s evolution both sonically and lyrically. A Voice for the Next Generation by singer Jack Cochrane tackles issues affecting today’s youth.

Opening with the album’s title track, an all-out protest against corrupt corporations and politicians, the album delves into the negative effects of social media on “Zuckerpunch,” and “13” tackles the lack of of mental health services and the deadly effects of poverty in Britain and its impact on society.

“The universe gave us time to create a record where we finally felt we could address some of the topics, whether they were societal or spiritual, that we were dying to scream,” said lead singer Jack. Cochrane about the album. “There are songs about highs and lows, things we really want to talk about and things we can’t help but feel, but have never made room for.”

Contagious, euphoric, heartfelt and chock-full of hooks, Burn The Empire is the work of a band living in the moment, with an eye to the future. Armed with a UK chart-topping album and an arsenal of adoring fans, The Snuts are on their way to becoming one of the most vital bands of recent years.

This summer The Snuts will perform at a range of UK festivals and support Kings Of Leon through their UK dates. Tickets for the band’s upcoming concerts are available here.

Listen to the new single here:

June 26, 2022 – Glastonbury, UK – Glastonbury Festival

June 28, 2022 – Glasgow, UK – OVO Hydro Arena*

June 29, 2022 – Newcastle, UK – Utilita Arena*

July 01, 2022 – London, UK – O2 Arena*

July 09, 2022 – Glasgow, UK – TRNSMT

July 19, 2022 – Glasgow, UK – Hampden Park with Gerry Cinnamon

July 29, 2022 – Matlock, UK – Y Not

July 31, 2022 – Penrith, UK – Kendall Appeal

November 19, 2022 – Liverpool, UK – M&S Arena +

* Support the Kings of Leon

+ Support Jamie Webster

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Purity Brewing Co. enters kombucha market as co-founder and CEO walks away https://liverpool-il.com/purity-brewing-co-enters-kombucha-market-as-co-founder-and-ceo-walks-away/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 02:00:00 +0000 https://liverpool-il.com/purity-brewing-co-enters-kombucha-market-as-co-founder-and-ceo-walks-away/ An independent brewery that has made a name for its line of beers is branching out into the growing kombucha market – its first foray outside of its core industry in its 18-year history. Purity Brewing Co. has launched Pure Booch, a line of slow-brewed, naturally flavored, preservative-free kombucha beverages. The news comes as co-founder […]]]>

An independent brewery that has made a name for its line of beers is branching out into the growing kombucha market – its first foray outside of its core industry in its 18-year history.

Purity Brewing Co. has launched Pure Booch, a line of slow-brewed, naturally flavored, preservative-free kombucha beverages.

The news comes as co-founder and chief executive Paul Halsey announces he is stepping back from the day-to-day management of the Warwickshire-based company to take on a non-executive role and relocate.

Kombucha is a fermented, sweetened black or green tea and is usually mild or very low in alcohol.

They have grown in popularity for their perceived health benefits and are considered by some to be a better alternative to surgery and sugary soft drinks.



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Purity’s new brand comes in four flavors – original, ginger and lime, cranberry and grapefruit – and was created by Patrick O’Connor, whose Birmingham-born kombucha brewery is now part of the group.

The new beverage list joins the company’s well-known beer brands such as Mad Goose, Longhorn IPA, Lawless Lager and Fixie Hybrid Coffee Stout.

The company also runs Purecraft Bar & Kitchen in Birmingham city centre, where its new range of drinks will be on sale alongside its online store.

Mr. Halsey said, “As a long-time kombucha user, I understand the health benefits but also the versatility it can bring. Being a brewed product, it seemed natural to introduce a kombucha into the Purity portfolio.

“Now recognized as one of the fastest growing beverage categories in the UK, we see this investment as a fantastic opportunity for Purity and Pure Booch.



Patrick O'Connor, founder of Pure Booch
Patrick O’Connor, founder of Pure Booch

Mr O’Connor added: “I am delighted to partner with Purity on this new venture. It is our vision for Pure Booch to shake up the market and become one of the leading authentically brewed kombucha brands in the UK. -United.”

Purity was founded in 2005 by Mr. Halsey and his business partner James Minkin.

The company has since gained a loyal following and launched Purecraft Bar & Kitchen, originally called Pure Bar, in Waterloo Street in 2014 in partnership with Andreas Antona, owner of Michelin-starred restaurant Simpsons in Edgbaston.

A sister site in Nottingham closed in 2017 after less than two years in operation. It also runs a visitor centre, shop, tours and cycling events at its brewery and head office in Great Alne near Alcester.

Mr Halsey has now announced he is stepping down from his day-to-day role as chief executive from the end of this month to become a non-executive director and is also moving to Yorkshire ahead of plans to marry his long-term partner in August.

Managing Director Andy Maddock will take over as the new Managing Director.

Mr Halsey said: “After nearly 40 years in the drinks industry, I decided a lifestyle change was needed. It was not an easy decision to make, but was a lot motivated by my personal situation and the last interesting years.

“I am immensely proud of what we have achieved over the years. Above all, none of this would have been achieved without our loyal ‘puritans’ – customers, suppliers, investors and shareholders.

“I’ve never, ever spent a day working in this industry that I didn’t really enjoy. The loss of so many close friends over the past few years has made me realize how life is. precious.

“I am absolutely confident that Purity, Purecraft Bar & Kitchen and now Pure Booch will realize their full potential over the next few years and I look forward to seeing them grow. Purity has been a wonderful journey and one that I will never forget. . “

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Sickle Cell Awareness Campaign https://liverpool-il.com/sickle-cell-awareness-campaign/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 23:12:31 +0000 https://liverpool-il.com/sickle-cell-awareness-campaign/ A new campaign is launched to help raise awareness of sickle cell disease. NHS England launches the Can You Tell It’s Sickle Cell? campaign, which will help raise awareness of the main signs and symptoms of the disease. A new NHS training program will also help staff better understand the condition, seizures and how to […]]]>

A new campaign is launched to help raise awareness of sickle cell disease.

NHS England launches the Can You Tell It’s Sickle Cell? campaign, which will help raise awareness of the main signs and symptoms of the disease.

A new NHS training program will also help staff better understand the condition, seizures and how to care for patients.

Health Secretary Sajid Javid speaking at the NHS ConfedExpo at ACC Liverpool (Peter Byrne/PA)

The campaign launch, which takes place on World Sickle Cell Day on Sunday, comes less than a year after the NHS struck a deal to roll out the first sickle cell treatment in 20 years, which will help up to 5,000 people over three years to have a much better quality of life.

People with the disorder, which disproportionately affects people of Black African and Caribbean descent, experience severe pain during a “sickle cell crisis” that can occur several times a year, often requiring hospitalization in order to be able to give morphine to control pain and prevent organ failure which can be fatal.

Symptoms of a seizure include, but are not limited to, severe pain, fever, one-sided paralysis, difficulty walking, sudden changes in vision, and confusion.

Speaking at NHS Confed/Expo on Wednesday, NHS Chief Executive Amanda Pritchard said: ‘I’ve heard some really powerful stories from patients living with sickle cell disease about their experience of the wider health service, how they were treated appallingly when they needed to go to A&E, so much so that they told me they had to think twice and often delay coming for care when they needed it .

“This brings us back to tackling health inequalities.

“One of the patients I spoke to asked me, ‘If I was white, would I be treated like this?’ She did not believe the NHS as a whole saw her as an equal. This must change.

“I am determined that we need to improve things for this particular patient group, but it also shows how we need to improve the experiences of all patients, gain the confidence to ensure that each individual feels empowered to ask for help when needed and believe they will be listened to if they tell us something is wrong.

John James, chief executive of the Sickle Cell Society, said: “It’s really great to see the NHS’s first national campaign against sickle cell disease going online.

“Sickle cell disease is a debilitating disease that affects individuals and families.

“We need to significantly raise awareness about this disorder.

“It is only through increased awareness and education of healthcare professionals and the general public that we will begin to see an improvement in the patient experience and ultimately their health outcomes. “

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Ex-Liverpool drugs boss ‘Juicebomb John’ honored for his work with ex-convicts https://liverpool-il.com/ex-liverpool-drugs-boss-juicebomb-john-honored-for-his-work-with-ex-convicts/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 18:27:27 +0000 https://liverpool-il.com/ex-liverpool-drugs-boss-juicebomb-john-honored-for-his-work-with-ex-convicts/ A former criminal who was jailed for his role in a £1million drugs plot has won an award for his work in helping hundreds of ex-offenders find long-term jobs. John Burton, of Vauxhall, was sentenced to nine-and-a-half years in 2012 after orchestrating a £1million plot that supplied cannabis, cocaine and amphetamines to peddlers in South […]]]>

A former criminal who was jailed for his role in a £1million drugs plot has won an award for his work in helping hundreds of ex-offenders find long-term jobs.

John Burton, of Vauxhall, was sentenced to nine-and-a-half years in 2012 after orchestrating a £1million plot that supplied cannabis, cocaine and amphetamines to peddlers in South Wales and of the West Midlands.

He later had a further 30 months added to his jail term after police unraveled an elaborate money laundering ring. Liverpool‘s father was once known as ‘Juicebomb John’ in the underworld due to his muscular looks.

READ MORE:Drug boss wanted ambulance to help transport cocaine during lockdown

John’s experience within the prison system convinced him that the conditions contributed to a tendency to recidivism. John realized that his own family was suffering while he was serving his sentence and decided to reject crime.

Towards the end of his time in the system, he became an advocate for prison reform. He spent hours reading in the prison library and discussing his ideas with prison directors.

Upon his release from prison in 2017, John founded Inside Connections, a nonprofit aimed at providing released prisoners with housing and work. Since then, the company has found work for 520 former prisoners.

Yesterday (Tuesday) John won the Robin Corbett Prize at a ceremony in the House of Commons. Robin Corbett was chairman of the all-party Criminal Affairs Group for 10 years until his death in 2012.

John, 51, told ECHO: “We are absolutely delighted to have won the 2022 Robin Corbett Prize. Winning a prestigious award like this is incredible and I would like to thank Lady Val, the judges, our team, all the employers we work with and the prisons.

“Given my experience, it has been difficult to secure the funding to launch Inside Connections, but we have succeeded and I am proud of the work we have done and will do in the future.

The panel of judges included the director of the Prison Reform Trust, a retired High Court judge and the chairman of the Prison Governors Association.



John Burton at Kirkdale Community Center

Lady Val Corbett, who founded the award, said: ‘It’s a true story that with his background, John turned his life around to help others, knowing that the problems of released prisoners recur in society. In that year alone, 182 people enrolled in their program achieved industry qualifications, with a pass rate of 98%. And 145 people have a permanent job.

“Inside Connections, formed in 2017, empowers individuals to change their lives like John did and they are a worthy winner on many levels.”

Inside Connections primarily works with people who have served or are about to serve prison time. The company engages with employers in the construction, energy and technology sectors to facilitate placements, training and careers for ex-offenders. Inside Connections also spends time with young offenders to help them stay out of trouble.

The Robin Corbett Prize for Prisoner Reintegration was established in 2013 by members of Lord Corbett’s family in conjunction with the Prison Reform Trust. It is now administered by the Corbett Foundation, a non-profit social enterprise.

To find out more about Inside Connections, email john@insideconnections-cic.co.uk or visit here.

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Andreas Christensen confirms Chelsea exit as Burnley stars scout for new clubs https://liverpool-il.com/andreas-christensen-confirms-chelsea-exit-as-burnley-stars-scout-for-new-clubs/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://liverpool-il.com/andreas-christensen-confirms-chelsea-exit-as-burnley-stars-scout-for-new-clubs/ Here are the latest Premier League titles for Saturday June 11. Christensen in motion Chelsea have confirmed that defender Andreas Christensen will leave the club when his contract expires at the end of the month. The Danish international is set to join La Liga giants Barcelona after 10 years at Stamford Bridge. He had not […]]]>

Here are the latest Premier League titles for Saturday June 11.

Christensen in motion

Chelsea have confirmed that defender Andreas Christensen will leave the club when his contract expires at the end of the month. The Danish international is set to join La Liga giants Barcelona after 10 years at Stamford Bridge.

He had not played for the Blues since withdrawing from selection on the morning of the FA Cup final against Liverpool. Defender Jake Clarke-Salter and midfielders Danny Drinkwater and Charly Musonda will also leave the Premier League club this summer, while Antonio Rudiger’s free transfer to Real Madrid has already been announced.

Christensen joined Chelsea academy from Danish club Brondby in 2012 and was loaned out to Borussia Mönchengladbach in the Bundesliga between 2015 and 2017. The 26-year-old scored twice in 161 appearances for the Blues, winning the League champions, the Europa League and the FIFA Club World Cup.

“Chelsea Football Club thanks Andreas for his contribution to our success over the past decade and wishes him well in his future career,” read a statement on the Blues’ website.

Former England international Drinkwater arrived in west London from Leicester in 2017 for a fee of around £35million. The 32-year-old managed just 23 outings for the Blues during an unsuccessful spell and has been loaned out to Burnley, Aston Villa, Turkish club Kasimpasa and Reading. Belgium’s Musonda, 25, has been limited to just seven first-team appearances for Chelsea, scoring once, while former England Under-21 international Clarke-Salter has featured twice during a partnership 16 years with the club.

READ MORE: Barcelona now linked with move for Leeds United target Marc Roca

Burnley release big names

Burnley trio Ben Mee, Aaron Lennon and James Tarkowski are among the 14 players who will leave the club this summer. Centre-back Tarkowski is set to join Everton after the Clarets were relegated from the Premier League, while fellow defender Mee and winger Lennon are included in a long list of departures.

Burnley said on their official website when announcing their shortlist: “Ben Mee, Aaron Lennon, Phil Bardsley, Dale Stephens and Erik Pieters are among a total of 14 professionals to leave the club at the conclusion of their contracts at Turf Moor at the end of this month.”

The club added: “James Tarkowski expressed his desire earlier in the season to seek an opportunity elsewhere when his contract expires, and he will also leave after over 200 appearances for the club.” Mee made over 350 appearances during a 10-year spell with the Clarets after joining Manchester City in 2012.

Lennon, who joined the club last summer after a two-year stint in Turkey with Kayserispor, appeared a total of 87 times in all competitions during his two spells at Turf Moor. Burnley say “discussions are still ongoing” with Matej Vydra and Jack Cork and that Ashley Barnes’ contract option has been activated to keep him at the club for another year.

Reporting in the chaos of the Champions League

A French government report into the problems at the Champions League final last month highlighted “multiple failures” in crowd management in Paris. After initially blaming ticketless Liverpool fans for the chaotic and disturbing scenes that saw supporters gathered and gassed outside the Stade de France ahead of their clash with Real Madrid, police chief Didier Lallement admitted more earlier this week that the operation had been a failure.

He also admitted he had no proof of previous claims that up to 40,000 Liverpool fans without tickets or with fake tickets had descended on the stadium. The 30-page government report, published on Friday, came to different conclusions, focusing instead on systemic failures and “the presence of malicious individuals” near the stadium.

A large number of Liverpool fans have reported being attacked and having property stolen off the ground.

According to the report: “The malfunction results, despite careful preparation, from multiple failures in the guidance and management of the crowd, in the insufficient communications between the RATP (transport operator) and the PC (public order body ), in the lack of suitable routes to the field, in the lack of coordination and the failure of dialogue between all parties when it came to recognizing the warning signs of the presence of malicious individuals who gathered in large numbers near the stadium to commit criminal acts.”

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Police arrest 17 men for violent attacks on women and girls https://liverpool-il.com/police-arrest-17-men-for-violent-attacks-on-women-and-girls/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 17:14:30 +0000 https://liverpool-il.com/police-arrest-17-men-for-violent-attacks-on-women-and-girls/ Police arrested 17 men for violent attacks on women and girls, including death threats, assault and battery, and harassment. Officers conducted a ‘day of action’ targeting a number of suspects named for domestic violence offenses including death threats, leaking private sexual images, assault causing actual bodily harm , assault and battery, harassment, malicious communications, and […]]]>

Police arrested 17 men for violent attacks on women and girls, including death threats, assault and battery, and harassment.

Officers conducted a ‘day of action’ targeting a number of suspects named for domestic violence offenses including death threats, leaking private sexual images, assault causing actual bodily harm , assault and battery, harassment, malicious communications, and violation of a law not – order of assault.

Those arrested are between 21 and 55 years old and are from the Wirral, Knowsley, St Helens, Sefton, Liverpool and Skelmersdale areas. They are all currently in custody.

READ MORE: Outrage as French authorities say all CCTV of Stade de France final has been ‘removed’

Police said the day of action was “part of our ongoing commitment to address violence against women and girls” and coincides with the launch of their plan to combat violence against women. Women and Girls (VAWG) which aims to target and prosecute offenders, create safer spaces and improve trust and confidence in the police.

A Merseyside Police spokesperson said that across Merseyside and the UK, women and girls face incidents of violence, hate and sexual assault at work, in schools, in public transport, in open spaces and at home. They added “Many of these incidents go unreported and we know more needs to be done to address them.

“Tackling violence against women and girls is already a priority for Merseyside Police and the plan reiterates our commitment to making the difference we know our communities expect of us.”

Chief Constable Serena Kennedy said: ‘Today’s day of action is visible proof of our continued commitment to prosecuting offenders and protecting women and girls and I hope it demonstrates to people that we will take positive steps to bring the perpetrators to justice and build confidence in the victims. and survivors to come forward and talk to us.

“Merseyside Police are absolutely determined not only to respond to reports of crimes against women and girls, but to take every opportunity to reduce this by also making the best use of all the tools at our disposal, including protection orders. and prevention.

“We want to make Merseyside a place where women and girls feel safe and can live their lives free from fear and harassment, but we know this is not something we can do alone. Violence against women and girls is a problem across society and requires a collaborative solution.

“We will work with women and girls to ensure they have a say in how we deliver and develop our services and we will continue to work with our partners to better support women and girls to ensure we that they feel safe, that action is taken in their time of need, and that they have help in accessing emotional support or help with housing or finances.

“Internally, we will continue to develop our force culture and seek out and investigate those who do not represent the professional standards we expect of police and staff. We will also continue to work to ensure there is a force-wide understanding of violence against women and have a culture that displays attitudes and behaviors that will not condone misogyny in the organization or community. »



Chief of Police with DCC Maggie Blyth

Merseyside Police also today welcomed a visit from Home Secretary Priti Patel and Hampshire Deputy Chief Constable Maggie Blyth, who is the National Police’s lead on violence against women and girls. They were able to listen to a number of presentations and meet officers and staff from the Partnership for Violence Reduction, the Unity team responsible for investigating sexual offenses and the Op Cornerstone team responsible for targeting perpetrators of violence. marital.

They were also able to hear about some of the work being done on empowering women within Merseyside Police, including military leadership and the She Inspires football team. Home Secretary Priti Patel said: “Violence against women and girls is a heinous crime, and I am determined to tackle this menace.

“In England and Wales, we are recruiting 20,000 more police officers to help make our streets safer. So far, 629 more officers have been recruited from Merseyside Police and they have opened a dedicated unit to help make our streets safer. ensure that specially trained police officers are available to support rape victims.

“This is all part of delivering on our priority of addressing the diverse crimes of violence against women and girls, which are simply unacceptable and also preventable.” National police co-ordinator for violence against women and girls, Deputy Chief Constable Maggie Blyth, said: ‘It’s great to see so much happening in Merseyside to tackle violence towards women and girls.

“Days of action like this have a real impact and we want the perpetrators of these crimes to know that we will not tolerate any form of violence against women and girls. Action plans, like the one announced today’ today, were developed by all 43 forces so that good work and areas for improvement can be identified and coordinated.

“At the national level and within local forces, we have a good plan for change in policing that the violence against women and girls sector has helped shape and which is in the pipeline. origin of this. In my role as National Police Coordinator, I will review progress and ensure that it is delivered on what we intend to do. While we recognize that there is still much to do, we work hard to bring about meaningful change in the lives of women and girls.

Merseyside Police Commissioner Emily Spurrell said: “Tackling violence against women and girls is a top priority for myself and for the Chief Constable. We are both committed to creating a safer region for all women and girls who live, work and visit Merseyside.

“The publication of this Plan is a very welcome step in this work. It details how Merseyside Police will seek to make improvements in the way women and girls who are victims of violence are supported, how offenders are brought to justice and how they can ensure women feel safer wherever they go. they go.

“An essential part of my role is to scrutinize the Chief Constable on behalf of the Merseyside public. This framework will be a key document to monitor the performance of Merseyside Police to ensure we continue to see improvements month after month, year after year. Much of this review now takes place in public, so our communities can watch and listen firsthand to learn exactly how this work is done.

“The problem of VAWG is deep-rooted and complex and the police cannot tackle it alone. I will do my best to encourage our partners in criminal justice, community safety, health, education and beyond to play their part and I will soon launch my own delivery plan defining actions for all agencies to improve their response to VAWG, ensuring that victims are at the heart of everything we do.

“There is still a long way to go if we are to eradicate VAWG for good, but by working together we can be a force for change, making our region safer for all women and girls.

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